If your former spouse gets physical custody of your children, you may only have visitation with them. While you have limited time with them, you cherish your visits. But what happens if your ex wants to move away?

Being in the same area as your children helps you be a better parent. You may worry about how a move will affect that relationship. However, in Iowa, you may be able to request more time to ensure you can bond with your children.

A 150-mile move can trigger a modification

Under Iowa child custody rules, a move by a custodial parent can result in a modification. The court can change the arrangement to make sure that the non-custodial parent still has a relationship.

If your former spouse tries to move more than 150 miles away, you can ask a judge to modify your custody agreement. Iowa considers that distance to change the circumstances of your ability to bond with your children.

The court will try to maintain your relationship

With a change, the judge may let your children stay longer over holiday and summer breaks. The court can also require scheduled phone calls. And if your former spouse tries to interfere with this time, the court can make him or her pay a cash bond to make sure you have contact with your kids.

A modification may help you with a successful long-distance relationship

Even when you are in the same area, you may feel distant from your children. An arrangement that leaves you without joint or sole physical custody means that you only see them sporadically.

But if your former spouse moves, your visitation can be even more limited. If you only have occasional weekends, travel time can cut two days into one. And the less you see your kids, the less you can connect and bond with them.

A modification can make sure that you have extra time with your children. Even if you are miles away, you can still maintain a close relationship with them.